socs: that longfella fella (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow)

Longfella was a cheat

Evangeline, ha. She’s as real as my imaginary friend I drink with every 2nd Friday.

He never got off his ass to visit Nova Scotia, or  Grande Prè.

Gave a troubled people a past built on romantic soap opera poem.

Caused the Acadian Renaissance. Okay but . . . had a real past, too.

Liar and cheat; who else did you bamboozle into believing

your words were true.

Oh yeah Hiawatha+ by the Gichi-Gumi, by the shining Great Lake waters

and his lovely, tragic Minnehaha.

Real honest Native North American story, not.

And the DAR* on how Paul R. kept his ass on a horse to warn

the British are coming.

Seeing Revere’s silver-smithing  — a truer and longer lasting legacy.

So what, you say, all this vitriol, this long tirade on Longfellow.

His worse crime went unreported. Doubt he’d repent, anyways.

He looks in later photographs and as his bust at Grand Prè

just like my father.

If my father made it that long.

But he already had the whitening beard, and

sometimes the wild hair.

And Longfellow never came to Nova Scotia? Ha.

Not by a long shot. That Longfella fella.

+ Song of Hiawatha

* Daughters of the American Revolution (“Paul Revere’s Ride”)

“A SoCS rant all based on my silly brain going ‘Longfella is a cheat.’ I mean where do you go from there,” she shrugged her shoulders. “Thanks LindaGHill for hosting this,” she added.

Sumner-Longfellow

Longfellow cropped from a photo with Senator Charles Sumner

I don’t have a scanned photo of my dad with hair and beard to show the resemblance, but it’s there.

Bust of Longfellow at Grand Prè Historic Site dedicated to the Acadians, including the fictional Evangeline. My father could have been the sculptor’s model.

Statue of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (author of

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4 thoughts on “socs: that longfella fella (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow)

    • “And I thought it was universal,” she replied, “that all English teachers longed to prolong the school year by assigning the long-winded Longfellow to their students longingly looking outside.” She giggled, “long enough response?”

      Like

the time has come, the walrus said, to talk of many things . . .

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